‘techie’ is an insult

Hurt techies complain that ‘techie’ is an insult

San Francisco’s techies are worried that the term has become so derogatory that it’s causing them pain. They would prefer “hacker” or, well, “maker.”

When words get twisted, feelings get trampled, ululations soar, and hearts descend to pitiful infernos — the flames only dampened by tears.

It’s happening all around San Francisco, Calif., and it’s very concerning. It seems that those who work in the tech community are raging. They feel they are being insulted and they want to disrupt the insults.

What is hurting them so? It’s the very word “techie.”

 

 

Continue to read at @ http://www.cnet.com/news/hurt-techies-complain-that-techie-is-an-insult/

 

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Definitions of Web 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0

I read a comment on an article explaining Web 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 that I found really summarizes the whole thing:

Web 1: static [Read]
web 2: dynamic [Read/Write]
web 3: programmable[Read/Write/Execute]

I believe this is a great simplified way of expressing what each one is. It reminds me of UNIX-style permission bits for rwx.

In the beginning, there was read-only webpages. These static HTML files sat on webservers and were hyperlinked together.

Then, the read/write era came about. Now pages had Edit buttons; it became as easy to edit a page as it was to read it.

Now, the read/write/execute era is about to begin. Here, the Execute button is going to become as easy as the Edit button. The ability to tap into the CPU cycles of the internet is about to be unfolded.

Push technology

Solution 1: now sockets

http://socket.io/#home

Solution 2: pusher

http://pusher.com/
https://github.com/squeeks/Pusher-PHP
Using the best simplest technique trigger PHP and JS script to achieve the push result.

Solution 3: just the traditional techniques

You cannot push data to a browser, but what you can do is set up your webpage to poll your server every few seconds for updates. An example setup would be:

From within your website, have a javascript function that runs on a timer every few seconds (or whatever interval works best for your situation).

Start that timer on page load.

That javascript function invokes an AJAX call to a web service on your web server (more on that in a second).

On the server side you’ll need some sort of system that tracks these events and stores them somewhere such as in a database table with a timestamp. So for example when XYZ creates an account, that would be logged in this “event” table in the db.

The web service called by the AJAX call will then run a query on that table and retrieve all entries since the last time it was called. Then just update the webpage with those results.

It’s obviously not 100% “live” as there will be a small delay depending on what time interval you set in the JS timer but it’s pretty close.

Solution 4. FULL example for this kind of setup

http://css-tricks.com/chat2/

Learned Domain driven design (DDD)

Domain-driven design (DDD) is an approach to developing software for complex needs by deeply connecting the implementation to an evolving model of the core business concepts. The premise of domain-driven design is the following:

  • Placing the project’s primary focus on the core domain and domain logic
  • Basing complex designs on a model
  • Initiating a creative collaboration between technical and domain experts to iteratively cut ever closer to the conceptual heart of the problem.

Domain-driven design is not a technology or a methodology. DDD provides a structure of practices and terminology for making design decisions that focus and accelerate software projects dealing with complicated domains.

Email marketing as a part of business developement

As analytical programs become ever more common and important in business, the question remains, “How do we take the analytical information and translate it into an action plan to increase profits?”

Always on the mind of a marketer is how to turn valuable analytical data into more efficient and profitable campaigns. The main goal of an email marketer is to turn numerical data about open rates and click through rates and use it to build a relationship with your prospects and customers.

So where do you start? The easiest and most successful strategy is to split test different emails, subject lines, and link strategies to figure out which combination of these sends the most buyers to whatever page you’re looking to drive traffic.

Figure out why your audience does what it does

  1. Identify Subsets of Your Overall Audience: if you send an email to a large group of people, you’ll start to notice that people will respond to different stimuli. Some people will open all your emails and click through while many will never take any action on any of your offers no matter what you send. By observing which people take what actions you can create smaller “niche campaigns” within an overall list. This is a great way to increase your profits by simply targeting people who are interested in a subtopic that you cover.
  2. Conversion Analysis: is a way to monitor which people bought, which ones didn’t, and which ones got cold feet somewhere in the middle. This information is very valuable for tweaking your buying process by eliminating excuses not to buy.
  3. Source Analysis: Compare the data between email subscribers and general traffic to your website. This information will help you determine whether your email readers continue on to your website pages and the correlation between email subscribers and general traffic in regards of who buys more and what. Good information to figure out where your customers are coming from and which demographic prefers is converting more.
  4. Tracking What People Do On Your Site: track what people in a group do on your website. Measure how they react to certain emails and styles. This data can include purchase, registration, or acquisition data.
  5. Track your abandonment to find the “leaks” that reduce conversion rates. Something as simple as reducing the fields to fill out can easily produce a major increase in conversion rates. In addition, look over your offline marketing to figure out how it relates to your online marketing efforts.

How to Create Messages Based on a Specific Action

Real-time messaging is an extremely profitable email that also makes your customer happy. What happens is the customer receives an email based on what they’ve done recently such as signed up for a report or bought a specific product. To be successful with real-time messaging, it’s important to know where your customer is at in terms of “customer lifecycle” and where email will be most effective.

The five stages of the customer lifecycle are acquisition, conversion, growth, retention and reactivation. Each of these different times are important and have specific action steps that must be taken. By figuring out what you want to connect about and how you’ll do it, you can design an effective real-time messaging strategy. By taking raw analytical data and integrating it into your email marketing strategy, you’re going to get a more complete picture of their activity than if you used just one data source. By using both of these data sources, you can make email campaigns that are more complete.

Real-time messaging has a lot of potential to generate a high ROI for your time and money since they offer specific things that are highly related to what a person is doing online. If you plan smart, you can easily product very positive results with little effort.

Types of Triggers

  • Transactional Triggers: Transactional triggers are simply based on an event between you and your customer. Some examples are a prospect purchasing an item or opting in to receive a free report. These events are easy to define and you can create a specific message related to the event. A transactional trigger message would be a “thank you for purchasing” with their download link or a cross-selling email sharing with them another product of yours.
  • Recurring Triggers: Recurring triggers are defined by a profile rather than something actually happening. For example, a recurring trigger could be sending a bill to someone or a “happy birthday” email.

To become good at email marketing you need to learn how to turn analytical data into actionable steps that reward or correspond with the analytical data. Using email marketing, a marketer can build a relationship with follow-up messages. Email is fast, inexpensive, measurable, direct and automated, which means you can tie website behavior to a user.

Getting Started

Once you’ve figured out what you want to accomplish in your business, it’s critical to devise a way to use email marketing to help you get there.

  1. Get People to Buy More “Stuff” From You: you can offer related goods to someone who has just bought a product from you. Dropping them a note about something else that makes using their original purchase easier or faster is a good way to figure out what to send them.
  2. Turn Tire-Kickers In To First Time Customers: for example, if someone signs up for a free report related to a main topic, you can send educational emails encouraging them to purchase your introductory product. You could even include a special coupon that rewards them for taking action.
  3. Retain the Customers You Already Have: send emails to customers to continually build a buying relationship. If a customer hasn’t purchased recently, you can reactivate them by offering a stellar deal on some new products they might have not seen.

If you’ve got so much data you don’t know what to do with it all, just relax! Simply start with transactional messages, which are pretty easy to start using since most email services have automated follow-ups you can send out in a certain pattern after the initial transaction. Once you get transactional messages out there, start segmenting your list based on the actions they take. Lastly, make sure you’re constantly split-testing all your conversion points to slowly but surely increase your conversion rates (which means higher profits). The critical part of email marketing is to keep it simple by focusing on implementing new items, monitoring the results, testing new stuff to improve your system, and keep it running into the future.

Remember, “Build it and it will convert” doesn’t happen in the email marketing world. If you provide a good customer experience you’ll have all the success you need with impact email marketing.